Review : Wireless smart speakers 2020

Smart speakers we recommend

Need a new speaker to listen to? A smart speaker can control the entire home. But how good do they sound?

smart speaker

The world is modernizing at a furious pace, and the home is getting smarter. Products are getting smarter individually, and now the time has come for them to work seamlessly together. The solution lies in a smart speaker. In other words, a compact speaker that is connected to the home network, and which with a built-in microphone can be controlled with the voice. You can ask it to play your favorite music, it can tell you what time it is, about the traffic, the weather in the neighborhood and if you have any appointments today.

The speaker can also control other gadgets. If you have a smart robot vacuum cleaner, you can dictate the speaker to vacuum, and the vacuum cleaner suddenly starts to whirl. Or ask for the lighting to dim for a bit of evening entertainment, play a specific program on Netflix or YouTube, and ask who is ringing the doorbell. “Hey, Google, how much time is left of the laundry?” Magic occurs when the right products suddenly begin to communicate with the same language. It has not yet become completely streamlined, but we are now well on our way.

Nine speakers – three systems

There are mainly three different smart speaker systems: Amazon Alexa, Google Home and Apple HomeKit. They know many of the same things, and control some of the same products. But they are not compatible with each other. And only one of them speaks Norwegian at the time of writing.

We’ve put together nine voice-activated speakers, all of which use either Google Home or Amazon Alexa, and we’ve also got an Apple HomePod. Neither this nor Amazon Echo (2nd Generation) has official Norwegian distribution, but Kjell & Company were so nice to lend them to us.

The third-party manufacturers are divided into two camps, between Amazon and Google. They have exactly the same voice functionality as the original speakers, and are perfect alternatives in terms of use. The differences are in build quality, sound quality and other functions (battery operation, water resistance, etc.). Sonos One is a bit special, as it both supports Alexa and can be included in Apple’s HomeKit (but then the voice must be controlled indirectly from an Apple speaker or iPhone). Full Google Home functionality will also be on the way, and if and when it comes in a future update, Sonos will be the only manufacturer so far to offer both Google and Amazon in the same product. Marshall Stanmore II Voice also comes in two versions; one for Google Home and one with Amazon Alexa, but you do not get both in the same product. We have tested the Google version.

Smarter speaker does not mean better sound

It can be easy to imagine that a more modern product automatically also means that the sound is better than before. This is not necessarily the case. The simplest speakers have a full-tone element, and perhaps a passive radiator element or a bass reflex port to provide fuller bass. At the opposite end you will find, for example, the Apple HomePod, which uses several elements and a DSP that adapts the sound to the room, so you get about the same sound no matter where it is located. The test shows that there is a difference in the sound quality among the speakers, and that the average quality is as expected of ordinary, compact table speakers.

 

This is how we experienced the different services

Apple got started late, with the HomePod speaker and the HomeKit smart system. This, combined with the fact that the company is very careful with network security and thus does not let go of any product, means that there are not very many smart products you get connected to Apple’s voice control system. Unless you resort to unofficial solutions like HomeBridge to tie them together.

So far, no third-party speaker manufacturers have been allowed to create full-fledged alternatives to Apple’s HomePod. The speaker is not officially launched in Norway and does not understand Norwegian, although Apple’s voice assistant Siri is known to speak Norwegian quite well.

 

 

Google came to the table a year later than Amazon, but in return has quickly expanded the Home system to be very comprehensive and user-friendly. Google Home is also the only one of the three systems that speaks Norwegian, and thus it really takes a lot to choose something else here at home. This can of course be changed, but so far there is little indication that anyone will regain Google’s language skills.

Like Alexa, Google Home is compatible with a number of third-party smart products, and can control these by voice. You can also set up routines, where you can say, for example: “Hey, Google, it’s movie time,” whereupon the lights are dimmed, the blinds go down, and the TV is set to Netflix. For some reason, this function does not yet exist in Norway, so you have to ask for one action at a time.

 

 

It was Amazon that kicked off in 2014 with the smart speaker Echo, and the built-in voice assistant Alexa. Alexa has not officially arrived in Norway yet, so you must either be relatively proficient in English, German or Japanese to use it. In addition, you must put your residential address in your Amazon account to e.g. England or anywhere else in the world supported.

Third-party Alexa speakers that require an account to be used (eg Sonos) can also not be registered with a Norwegian residential address to link with the Alexa service. Among music services, Alexa works best with Amazon’s own. But their Music Unlimited does not work with a Norwegian account, and if the billing address is set to the UK, you will not be able to use a Norwegian Visa card. Alexa also works with Spotify, but then you must always specify that you want the music to be played in Spotify.

Alexa supports a number of smart products. And when it works, it’s very stable. Goole Home is experienced more casually: a sentence that worked two minutes ago may need to be reformulated next time. Another thing we liked about Alexa is that after you have started the vacuum cleaner (“Ask Roomba to start cleaning”), you can ask it to stop, and Alexa will ask if you want the vacuum cleaner to return to the charging station. When Google Home stops the vacuum cleaner, it just stops.
Alexa can be set up with routines, so you can give it a command whereupon many actions happen at once.

What do you think?

0 / 5. 0

Libratone Zipp Mini 2
Libratone Zipp Mini 2

Looks like a thermos

Libratone goes against the flow, and the Alexa speaker Libratone Zipp Mini 2 looks like a thermos. It is portable, plays music well, and two can be connected in stereo.

Our verdict

12 hours of battery life makes the speaker very flexible. Clear sound on speech and approved sound on music.
There is a lack of bass, and the speaker falls short when you want to gobble up. As is well known, Alexa does not speak Norwegian.
  • Type: Wireless smart speaker
  • Management system: Amazon Alexa
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, AirPlay 2, Spotify Connect
  • Connection: 3.5 mm aux, USB
  • Speaker element: 3 ”bass, 1” treble
  • Dimensions: 10 x 22.4 x 10 cm
  • Colors: Large selection
  • Other: Laptop
  • Web: libratone.com
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Price 69 £

Libratone voice control with Alexa, so your English skills should be in place. But when everything is connected, and your gadgets are connected in the system, then it is a common affair to control the speaker and other connected products. Alexa is also good at coming up with follow-up questions if you have come up with an incomplete command. The Libratone Zipp Mini 2 is a portable speaker, with even better battery capacity than the Kygo B9 / 800. However, it is not waterproof like the Kygo, but moisture-repellent and can be used in the bathroom while you shower. Just do not use it in the shower.

Zipp Mini 2 is nice to look at, if you do not suddenly realize that it looks like a thermos and that is all you can think of. But our copy in red did well in the window frame. The cover is fastened with a zipper, and can be replaced with optional colors.

In terms of sound, the speaker is balanced, with clear voices. Important when listening to the voice assistant and the news, when you ask to have them read out. The midrange reproduction is very nice, as is the treble, and there are no noises to be heard when the music is playing. When rock is on the menu and you want to gobble up, however, Libratone falls short. This is more for background music.

The sound quality is generally better than that of the Kygo B9 / 800, the only reason to go for Kyogen is because you need it waterproof.

Conclusion

Libratone Zipp Mini 2 is a portable smart speaker with a good battery capacity of 12 hours, and it is nice to look at. The sound is also good. Open and good, the voices come out clearly. It lacks a bit of fun, it does not get very exciting when you go on with rock and metal. But for background music, it works fine, and the Alexa voice control is as good as with Amazon’s own Echo. On the other hand, buying the Zipp Mini 2 instead of the Echo must be because you want the portability – or the look.

Harman Kardon Citation 100

Looks Fantastic

This is probably the prettiest speaker we've seen in its class. However, the Harman Kardon Citation 100 fails to take sound advantage of its larger exterior.

Our verdict

The speaker has a beautiful finish in wool, and looks fantastic. Google voice control makes it speak Norwegian, and the sound is very clear and pleasant.
Does not play as big and powerful as the size gives hope for.
  • Type: Wireless smart speaker
  • Management system: Google Home
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
  • Connection: –
  • Speaker element: 102 mm bass, 20 mm treble
  • Dimensions: 17.2 x 27.5 x 16.3 cm
  • Colors: Gray or black
  • Other: Two can be connected in stereo
  • Web: harmankardon.com
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Price 199 £

The cylindrical Harman Kardon Citation 100 is truly a sight, compared to the usual other speakers in this class. Our copy came in gray wool, and is so tasteful that even the wife could imagine having one.

The user experience is the same as with other Google speakers. Which means that it both understands Norwegian, can connect and speak to many products, and that it also has some flaws that allow you to give the exact same command from one day to the next, but suddenly the assistant does not understand you (“Hey , Google, change the color of the ceiling light to red ”). But the assistant has quite just learned Norwegian, we expect this will only get better.

The sound of Citation 100 is good. Partly very good. Acoustic music is played with more weight and bass than with both Google Home, Amazon Echo, Kygo B9 and Libratone Zipp Mini 2. Female vocals have crisp, nice overtones, and the bass appears clearer and deeper than the smaller speakers in the field. It is a bit slim down in the middle tone of deep male voices, but more airy female vocals are clear and nice. News readers are also much clearer than with Google Home.

The problem arises when you pull on a little. You should not play very loud until everything flattens out. The bass is almost gone, and the sound becomes flat and tame. You can connect two in stereo, then it will fill the room better, but you can not do anything with the dynamics.

Conclusion

Harman Kardon Citation 100 is the finest speaker we have come across in its field, with a great wool finish and an appealing shape. The user-friendliness is very good, and the sound is clear and nice. In addition, there is more body in the bass than on the smaller speakers.

When you turn up the volume, however, it loses important bass, and the sound sounds significantly flatter. And it is not very high, no more than it should be able to cope. Thus, it can not replace the stereo system anyway.

Marshall Stanmore II Voice Google Assistant

Concert from the bookshelf

Marshall Stanmore II plays much louder sound than the competition, without compromising the balance. It crushes them, quite simply.

Our verdict

No other smart speakers we have heard deliver this sound pressure. It just gets even heavier because it also sounds balanced and good enough for calm tones.
The sound can be experienced as a bit rough at the edges, and the appearance of the Marshall speakers does not appeal to everyone.
  • Type: Wireless smart speaker
  • Management system: Google Home
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Chromecast
  • Connection: 3.5 mm, RCA
  • Speaker element: 5.5 ”bass, 2 x 3/4” treble
  • Dimensions: 35 x 19.5 x 18.5 cm
  • Colors: Black
  • Web: zoundindustries.com
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Price 399 £

Marshall Stanmore II Voice looks like a guitar amp of the same brand. This can quickly become a love / hate object, but in the right home environment it will definitely find its place. It has just arrived in the Google Assistant version, which works with the Google Home system. There is also an Alexa version, so be sure to choose the right speaker from the store shelf!

Stanmore II Voice is among the largest in its class, and definitely the largest in this test. Then you have also got room for a roughly five inch large bass, and two treble elements. Because it plays in stereo. With 80 watts of amplification and a maximum sound pressure of 107 dB (imagine that you start a fairly powerful outboard motor).

The sound of Marshall is really loud. Whether it is AC / DC or Ariana Grande that is on the menu, the speaker draws with much more authority and power than anyone else in its field. It does not have as deep bass as the Apple HomePod, and does not get the same undertones in a bass guitar or a voice. The Apple speaker is also finer in the treble. But Marshall’s midfielder is in a completely different league. When the sound is also balanced enough to work with acoustic music, the extra power in Stanmore II becomes extra intense. This is the first smart speaker we have tested that is close to being able to replace the stereo system. At least in a smaller living room.

Conclusion

It looks like a guitar amplifier, and is then also the most powerful smart speaker in its field. There is no one else we have heard who plays better than Marshall Stanmore II Voice. If you choose the Google Assistant version (there is also one with Alexa), you also get the best user-friendliness in this country, as it speaks Norwegian. The sound is a bit coarse-grained, but still rock hard! And balanced enough to work with all music. This is entertainment!

Apple HomePod
Apple HomePod

Approved from Apple

Apple HomePod has very good sound and is easy to use. But smart steering seems too rigid and solid.

Our verdict

Impressive deep bass combined with clear, airy sound. In addition, the HomeKit system is very stable.
It's not just about adding products to control. As there are currently quite a few of. Does not speak Norwegian
  • Type: Wireless smart speaker
  • Control system: HomeKit
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, AirPlay 2, Bluetooth (not for audio)
  • Connection: –
  • Speaker element: 1 bass, 7 treble
  • Dimensions: 14.2 x 14.2 x 17.2 cm
  • Colors: Gray, white
  • Web: apple.com
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Price 199 £

HomePod is really elaborate in appearance. A 360 speaker that sends the sound (roughly) the same in all bills, and which you only know will work seamlessly as soon as you browse the Home app on your iPhone. Apple can do this with stability.

Adding products you want to control does not go smoothly. To add our Philips Hue lights, we need to enter an 8-digit code, which is on the box somewhere. That said, Apple has the most stable management of these. Even when the Philips servers were down and both Alexa and Google came to a standstill when we tried to do something with them, Apple did not ask twice. The light turned red when we asked for it!

Other smart products such as our iRobot Roomba vacuum cleaner and Arlo surveillance camera, however, you have to download an unofficial HomeBridge to make it work. And even Apple TV has only limited control over it. Sound level, pause, start, back and forth. In other words, you can not ask it to put on a given program on Netflix, as both Google Home and Amazon Alexa can (then with Chromecast and Fire Stick). Apple is simply not in the same league.

In terms of sound, Apple is several horseheads ahead of both Google and Amazon’s speakers. Not least thanks to its built-in DSP which monitors the acoustics and adjusts the sound accordingly. But third-party manufacturers give them competition in terms of sound, and it does not quite hold that the Apple HomePod may be the one that sounds best, when the price is so high and the smart system is so inflexible.

Conclusion

The Apple HomePod sounds better than most smart speakers we’ve tested. Smart control is also experienced as very stable, almost without errors.

Unfortunately, not many third-party smart products are directly supported, so you have to resort to unofficial solutions – which then probably will not enjoy the same stability. It is also tricky to add those who are actually supported. The rigid structure behind HomeKit takes some of the excitement and fun out of the thing.

Hama Sirium 1400ABT

Bigger does not mean bigger sound

Hamas' smallest Alexa speaker Sirium 1400ABT is a bit larger than the Amazon Echo, but still fails to give us any greater sound.

Our verdict

Clear enough sound, and the speaker enjoys the functionality of the Alexa system.
Larger cabinets still do not produce louder sound than the smaller competitors. Cannot currently pair in stereo. Alexa does not speak Norwegian.
  • Type: Smart speaker
  • Management system: Amazon Alexa
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, DLNA
  • Connection: USB (updates only)
  • Speaker element: not specified
  • Dimensions: 14 x 14 x 18.5 cm
  • Colors: Black
  • Web: turascandinavia.com
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Price 50 £

The Hama Sirium 1400ABT is large in the middle of the tree, much like the Apple HomePod. Although it has a somewhat cheap finish, Hamas has still managed to make it elegant enough. Gold-colored details could have been harry, but are instead tastefully done, on an otherwise black cylinder speaker.

The speaker has Bluetooth for streaming from mobile, and also DLNA function so you can stream via the network. Spotify was not officially supported during the test period, but we got a beta version to test with. Hama insists that a Spotify update is on the way.

Hama has a distinct treble reproduction, so that speech and singing voices come out clearly. There is a lack of finesse in the tones, and we do not quite get the benefits of the larger cabinet compared to the smaller Libratone Zipp Mini 2 and Amazon Echo G2. There is not much more bass or power here. It sounds perfectly fine, and never does any harm, but it is a little unengaging and flat. Hama is more open and clearer than Google Home, but so are all the others in this test.

Ease of use is like any other Alexa speaker. It can do the same tricks, control the same things and use the same app. Which is good, because Alexa works if you are proficient in English or German.

Conclusion

With Sirium 1400ABT, Hama has made a smart speaker that looks elegant enough, despite a slightly cheap feeling when you feel it. It sounds distinct and fine, no major flaws. It lacks a bit of finesse and air at the very top, and it does not benefit from a larger cabinet than the smallest in the test. All right.

The speaker is as user-friendly as other Alexa speakers, but is more expensive than the Amazon Echo without being better. We also miss stereo pairing, the manufacturer is working on a future update here.

Google Home

Enormous potential

The Google Home system has enormous potential, but as a speaker this is not the best.

Our verdict

Perhaps the market's most successful voice control and merging of smart products.
Even if the bass is full enough, it murmurs upwards in the voice range, and destroys the sound from both the voice assistant and the newscaster. We miss routine commands in Norway.
  • Type: Smart speaker
  • Management system: Google Home
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
  • Connection: –
  • Speaker element: 2 x 2 ”+ 2 x 2” passive radiators
  • Dimensions: 9.6 x 14.2 x 9.6 cm
  • Colors: White w / gray fabric
  • Web: storegoogle.com
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Price 39 £

When we last tested the Google Home speaker, we were impressed with the concept and usability, and we did not get too hung up on the sound. Now that the competitors have come up with the same opportunities, it must be considered on new premises, where the sound quality now weighs heavier.

Google Home easily connects compatible gadgets in your home, such as smart lights, robotic vacuum cleaners, Chromecast streaming, and more.

Google Home manages things easily, and it’s great to speak Norwegian. The vocabulary has potential, you have to test a bit to find commands that work. Naming the products is also important. For example, the light in the attic can advantageously be called “The light in the attic” in the app, so you can say: “OK, Google, turn on the light in the attic”.

It must be possible to combine several commands into a so-called routine. Then you can, for example, say: “OK, Google, it’s a football match”, then the TV goes to the right channel, the stereo system to the right sound mode and – what do we know – the oven is turned on because now the frozen pizza is going to pers. This does not work in Norway, but hopefully soon.

Unfortunately, Google Home disappoints on audio. The bass is fuller than with the much cheaper Home Mini. But it sounds closed and confined, which is silly when you hear what the voice assistant and newscasts say. In return, Google Home has bidirectional Bluetooth, so the speaker can be connected to other wireless speakers or headphones, or streamed from the mobile to Home.

Conclusion

Google Home is easy to use and only gets smarter as you use it. Unfortunately, the sound is confined, and now that it has received competition, we have to draw much more for this than when we tested it for the first time. There are in fact more well-sounding alternatives with the same voice control. We would rather buy the Home Mini or any of the other Google Home speakers in this test.

Sonos One

A smarter Sonos

Sonos One will one day give us both Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa in one and the same smart speaker. But Google is waiting.

Our verdict

Sonos One withstands moisture and sounds good. With upcoming updates, it will be among the most versatile on the market.
Until further notice, it is Alexa who applies, who does not speak Norwegian. There are speakers with heavier bass.
  • Type: Smart speaker
  • Management system: Amazon Alexa
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, AirPlay 2, Spotify Connect
  • Connection: Ethernet
  • Speaker element: not specified
  • Dimensions: 16 x 12 x 12 cm
  • Colors: White or black
  • Other: Works in stereo pairs
  • Web: sonos.com
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Price 169 £

In terms of size, the Sonos One is almost identical to the Play: 1, but the look is a little more discreet to be able to blend even more into the interior. The buttons on the top have provided space for touch controls to start and stop playback as well as control the sound level.

The installation is as usual ridiculously simple. You choose to add a new speaker to the app, tap the pairing app on the back, and it will appear. You can pair two pieces to get a small stereo system. Or use two pieces as rear speakers in a small home theater, along with Playbase or Sonos Playbar.

Like the simpler Play: 1, One sounds very good for its size. It has an open sound, with a warmer and fuller midrange than the others in the class. Important on both voices and instruments, and Sonos also follows upwards. Run TruePlay room correction, and it becomes even more distinct upwards, but then it can also be in the sharpest layer. Sonos is still among the most sonorous in this test.

Alexa works just as well on the Sonos One as on the Amazon Echo. Steer the road with your voice! It also has built-in AirPlay 2, and can be voice controlled via iPhone or an Apple HomePod. But it can not be voice controlled directly with the Apple system. As far as Google Home is concerned, this has been constantly postponed since its launch in 2017. The latest news from Sonos is that it is constantly being worked on, and “the plan is during 2019”. In other words, it is Alexa in English that applies in the foreseeable future.

Conclusion

Only Sonos is Sonos, and the usability of Sonos One is in class with others from the same manufacturer. In the top seat, in other words. The sound is nice, especially the midrange is rich and adds warmth to voices and instruments. Clear speech is a nice plus, when talking to the speaker. Unfortunately, Google Home support is still vulnerable, it is Alexa in English that applies.

Amazon Echo
Amazon Echo (2nd Generation)

Clear voice

With ready-made sound on the voice assistant, only the language barrier stands between us and the automated work tasks.

Our verdict

A compact and appealing appearance, clear speech sound and also a stable and good control system compared to other devices. Two can be paired in stereo.
The sound is tame on music, you have to take some detours to get the speaker connected in Norway, and Alexa does not understand Norwegian.
  • Type: Smart speaker
  • Management system: Amazon Alexa
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
  • Connection: 3.5mm aux
  • Speaker element: 2.5 ”bass, 1” treble
  • Dimensions: 14.8 x 8.8 x 8.8 cm
  • Colors: black, gray and many more
  • Other: Works in stereo pairs
  • Web: amazon.com
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Price 39 £

After drawing an Amazon account with a street address in a supported country (we used U.K.), the initial setup is straightforward and intuitive. If you have a smart product that you do not find with “add device”, then it may still exist as a “skill”. We noticed this, for example, with our robot vacuum cleaner from iRobot, which Alexa installed as a skill.

Control of smart lights (Philips Hue) in the desired room is playfully easy, the robot vacuum cleaner is sent out on a sweep, and the system behaves very stably.

Since we do not have an Amazon Music account, we have not tested this, but every time we want to play music, we get the error message that the service is not connected. If, on the other hand, we ask Alexa to play a given song on Spotify, then the song will come. Mostly. Sometimes the song is not found, even though we know it is on Spotify and Alexa pronounces the name correctly. Tidal is otherwise officially supported by Alexa, but not in Norway.

The sound is perfectly fine, with clear speech. But no pronounced musician, until it becomes too flat and unengaging. Fortunately, the speaker can be connected to better sound systems with Bluetooth or cable. You can alternatively connect two Echo speakers in stereo, the money should then perhaps be spent on a fatter speaker.

Conclusion

Echo is a nice little speaker, with a great finish and good design. It does little of itself and blends in with the interior. Little of it unfortunately also makes it sonic. Clear speech is all well and good, but the music sounds in the flattest layer. But in fact nothing flatter than a couple of competitors with larger physical goals. Ease of use is very good, if you master English and can live with the fact that not all services and products are supported in Norway.

Kygo B9/800

Smart speaker that can swim

Kygo B9/800 is the only smart speaker we know of that you can take with you to the swimming pool.

Our verdict

Withstands water up to a meter depth for 30 minutes. It even floats! Google Home makes the Kygo B9 / 800 an exciting portable speaker.
The sound can be experienced a little strained over time. For desktop use, the USB connector on top is not very nice, with a cable sticking up and hanging down.
  • Type: Wireless smart speaker
  • Management system: Google Home
  • Wireless: Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
  • Connection: Aux, USB C
  • Speaker element: 2 x 1.75 ”
  • Goals: –
  • Colors: White or black
  • Other: Portable, Waterproof (IPX7), can be connected in pairs
  • Web: kygolife.com
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Price 30 £

The Kygo B9 / 800 is the first portable smart speaker on our test bench. The battery should last for eight consecutive hours, and the speaker has both Bluetooth for mobile connection and Wi-Fi to connect to the Google Home system. For outdoor use, it benefits from being waterproof (IPX7), and can be soaked to a depth of one meter for up to 30 consecutive minutes. To achieve this, it is clad in rubber, which seals tightly around the speaker. Which in turn means that one has to make powerful EQ adjustment with digital processing (DSP), so that it does not sound completely confined.

Two speakers can be connected in stereo, and the speaker works just as well as any other Google speaker. “Hey, Google, vacuum!” Since it goes into sleep mode after a long time without power, it should in practice be connected to the socket at home. Then it is stupid that the charging socket is on top, because it is not a nice view of the bedside table, with the cable sticking up from the top. You can lay it horizontally, but it works best standing up.

The voice assistant sounds clear, much more so than with Google’s own Home speaker. But getting the harmonics through a layer of rubber requires a lot of processing, and creates a lot of distortion. The treble does not get exactly dissolved and airy, more forward and sharp. There’s not much bass to talk about here either, and it sounds a bit strained in the long run.

Conclusion

If you want a Google speaker that is both portable and waterproof (and floats!), Then the Kygo B9 / 800 is a safe purchase, with ok sound. If not here’s a new product just for you! Conversely, there are better portable speakers out there, if you do not need the Google functionality. You can easily alternatively spend NOK 600 on a Google Home Mini, and the rest of the budget on an even better portable speaker.

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