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Review: Tivoli Model One Digital 2 gen

A Tivoli in every room

The classic Tivoli Audio radio in digital version has finally been updated. For the better.

Karakter
Tivoli Model One Digital 2 gen
forfatter
Published 2021-11-08 - 7:00 am
Our opinion
Compact and stylish design, with AirPlay2 and Chromecast built-in.
The sound is still a bit too dark, and the price is quite high.
Specifications
  • Radio: DAB+/FM
  • Wireless: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, AirPlay 2, Chromecast
  • Streaming Services: Spotify Connect
  • Connections: AUX analog input
  • Headphone output: No.
  • Presets: Yes
  • Screen: Yes
  • App Manager: Google Home
  • Remote control: Yes
  • Dimensions: 22.2 x 11.5 x 14 mm
  • Weight: 1.55 kg
  • Finish: White/gray, black, walnut/gray.
  • Web: tivoliaudio.eu

The well-known Tivoli radio has turned digital a long time ago. For better or worse, but mostly for the better. At least now when the beginner’s flaws are gone, and the radio has been given more functions.

Because with AirPlay 2 and Chromecast built-in, the Tivoli Model One Digital is in the 2nd generation, with one becoming more interesting for even more people.

The compact table radio still has FM and DAB+ radio, with Bluetooth for streaming, but with streaming over Wi-Fi, the sound is even better. The table radio has not changed its appearance, and you have to turn it over to read the writing on the back of the radio to be sure that it is the upgraded generation 2.

With the combination of radio and streaming, you can listen to your favorite stations, and switch to streaming from Spotify, Tidal, Apple Music or other services, such as TuneIN online radio.

AirPlay 2 and Chromecast, also make it possible to include desktop radio in either Apple or Google’s universe, so you can stream to multiple devices in the house at the same time. Tivoli radio included.

The remote control controls everything except the streaming from the mobile. Photo: Lasse Svendsen

Ease of use

The radio still looks modern and stylish. The warm walnut veneer in combination with a gray front, is the most classic and most similar to the original. The black one, like our test sample, or the white one, may fit more easily into a white kitchen interior, but you have at least three choices.

There is still a 3.5-inch full-range unit behind the front fabric, and next to it you will find, at least for us, the cursed adjustment wheel that surrounds the screen.

The setting wheel is used to switch between stations, storage and much more, while the small potmeter next to it is on/off, source selection and volume. A remote control is also included.

In the past, we have been annoyed by the fact that everything takes so long. Changing source, radio station, loggin on to the network, etc., but apart from the fact that it still takes half a minute for the radio to come to life after you have switched it on, everything works much faster now. The inertia is mostly eliminated, and with the mobile phone in hand, you control easy playback from the streaming services you may have.

Input for an external audio source. Photo: Lasse Svendsen

Full sound image

Like always, the sound is best when streaming over Wi-Fi. Even a narrow-band radio net station with compressed datastream sounds better over the network than over Bluetooth.

The sound is best with Tidal over the network, where the sound from the small speaker opens up more, sounds come out better, and there is more impact in the bass.

The soundscape is still a bit too dark, but in return the bass is full and well defined. It is actually possible to play relatively loud, and get an engaging soundscape out of the small radio. Bo Kasper’s orchestra sounded well in the room despite the small speaker. And Black Cow from Steely Dan’s latest album, was highly enjoyable and dynamic enough to get a little carried away.

It worked just fine with the Keith Jarrett trio, because the warm sound from the double bass carried much of the rhythm in the soundscape, and the piano sound must be able to be called approved. The sound is a little better focused and more open from a Pinell Supersound 301, but not as rich.

Second generation of Model One Digital. by the way, can not be connected to the first generation Cube speaker, or any of the other first generation Tivoli wireless products.

One small detail reveals that this is a 2nd generation Model One Digital. Photo: Lasse Svendsen

Conclusion

The second generation of Tivoli’s Model One Digital has become even more relevant with the inclusion of AirPlay 2 and Chromecast. This makes it easier to integrate the desktop radio into a home where you are already streaming with either Apple or Andrlod devices. It does not seem like anything has been done with the sound, which is still a bit dark, about a both full-bodied and quite so engaging. Most beginner’s flaws are gone, and the radio seems solidly built. Had it not been for the high price, the Tivoli Model One Digital 2 generation, would have received our unreserved recommendation.

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Tamada

– what is a dark sound/soundscape ? Can you paraphrase ?

– I’ve returned a Pinell North and a Sony SRS-RA3000 because they were giving some extreme and very sibilant trebles (whistling hi-hats and exaggerated “sss” in speech/podcasts.)
Very tiring sound, that I could not correct with the given equalizers.
I’ve got points of comparison on the same sources /podcasts, with a Marantz Amp/Focal speakers or some headphones, where that “sibilance” is just not there.

Can I be safe on that side with that device ?

Thank you in advance.

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